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March for Science movement continues

Nicholas De Moss and Alexzander Lowman

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The March for Science on Earth Day, April 22,  started with scientists and science advocates grouping together; it quickly shifted into a movement that continues to grow even after the march is over.

The March for Science was both a celebration about how science is applied to our daily lives as well as a protest towards the blatant disregard and discreditation of scientists by politicians. Many of the people marching claim that politics has been filled with people with anti-science agendas.

In total, there were over 600 rallies worldwide; this includes every single state in the United States.

Many famous celebrities made appearances to show their support during the March for Science such as Neil DeGrasse Tyson, Bill Nye, Peter Capaldi and George Takei.

As a result of famous tv personas appearing, several people started to cosplay as characters that would be in favor of the march. These costumes range from Rick Sanchez (Rick and Morty) to Ms. Frizzle (The Magic School Bus), and Doctor Who.

“People have lost the ability to judge what is true and what is not, what is reliable, what is not,” said Neil DeGrasse Tyson during a video posted to Facebook. “That’s not the country I remember growing up in. I don’t remember any other time where people were standing in denial of what science was.”

An estimated total of attendees from the five cities Washington D.C., Chicago, New York City, Philadelphia, and London, reached nearly 110,000 protesters. This number is far less than the numbers of attendance for both the Women’s March and the March for Life.

Data gathered from self-registration has shown that only 30.6% of all attendees were scientists or science teachers. That suggests that the remaining 70% were merely science supporters.

The lead team of organizers for the March have continued to work on the promotion of science and have categorized their efforts into four directions: policy, outreach, education, and diversity.

Ayana Johnson, the co-director of partnerships for the event, hopes that the organization will be able to continue the momentum produced by the large March.

“At that first meeting the day after the March, the partners came to us and said, ‘Yesterday was amazing, and now we have work to do,’” said Johnson.

 

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March for Science movement continues